Posts Tagged string

String Concatenation Performance

Tags: , , ,

As programmers, we concatenate strings all the time. Should we worry about the performance? How about the amount of garbage we’re producing for the garbage collector? Today’s article runs a quick test to find out!

Read the rest of this article »

No Comments

String.Format() vs. Concatenation vs. String Builder

Tags: , , , ,

What’s the fastest way to build a string in C#? We have several options available to us. string.Format() is a function built right in to the string class., Concatenation ("a" + "b") is a feature of the language itself! The System.Text.StringBuilder class is a built in class with a name that makes it sound like it’s purpose-built for building strings. Today I pit these three against each other to find out just which one you should be using to build strings as quickly as possible.

Read the rest of this article »

16 Comments

Unity Script Performance Testing

Tags: , , ,

Today’s article is the first to test Unity script performance speed. It establishes a way to set up and test C# scripts in Unity whether you have access to Pro or not. As a first example, I was reminded by the news this week that AddComponent(string) is being removed in Unity 5.0. These alternative versions of AddComponent and GetComponent aren’t something I normally use, but the news got me thinking of their performance compared to the generic-typed versions: GetComponent<ComponentType>(). The docs say to avoid the versions taking a string, but how bad could the performance really be? Today’s article puts the two versions to the test to find out just that!

Read the rest of this article »

3 Comments

When getSize() Lies

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

flash.sampler.getSize() is a handy tool for figuring out how much memory a class instance uses. However, it is often flat-out wrong. Today’s article tries it out on a variety of classes to find out which ones it works on and which ones it doesn’t.

Read the rest of this article »

4 Comments

How Big Is That Class?

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

When you instantiate one of your classes, how much memory does it use? Today’s article tries out a lot of combinations and counts the bytes used. The conclusion is easy to remember and will give you a solid understanding of how much memory your app is using.

Read the rest of this article »

5 Comments

Four Ways to Clean Master Strings

Tags: , , , ,

When I first wrote about master strings I proposed a function that would help to trim them down and potentially save a lot of memory. However, that method still resulted in a string with a master string one longer than it. Ideally, we’d have no master string at all. Since then, three astute readers chimed in with alternate solutions to the problem. Today I put try all three out to see which method does the best job of cleaning master strings.

Read the rest of this article »

6 Comments

String Keys vs. Int Keys

Tags: , , , , , ,

Now that we know you can use int keys with Object, it’s time to test whether or not this is any faster than String keys. Today’s article does just that and also tests int and String keys with Dictionary.

Read the rest of this article »

5 Comments

Using Non-String Keys with Object

Tags: , , , ,

Pop quiz: what’s the difference between an Object and a Dictionary? If you said “Dictionary can have non-String keys”, you bought into a common myth. Today’s article shows the cases where the lowly Object class will use non-String keys whether you like it or not. Read on for the details.

Read the rest of this article »

6 Comments

5x Faster For-In Loops

Tags: , , ,

I’ve recently been notified of a way to dramatically speed up for-in loops. I’ve tested this method out and indeed there is a 5x speedup. Employing the technique is also really easy. Unfortunately, the speedup is sometimes an illusion. Read on to learn a little more about for-in loops and how you could potentially speed yours up by 5x.

Read the rest of this article »

9 Comments

The Four Vector Classes

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

There are four Vector classes in AS3. It seems like there is only one—Vector—and that it supports generics, but that is only an illusion. Today’s article will do some tests to reveal the implications to your app’s correctness and efficiency.

Read the rest of this article »

3 Comments