Posts Tagged garbage

An Alternative to Events

Tags: , , ,

C# has built-in events and they work fine in Unity projects. End of story, right? Not so fast! Have you ever wondered why the Unity API doesn’t have any C# events in it? Or why Unity made their own UnityEvent class for UGUI? Maybe there are some valid reasons to avoid C#’s events. Today’s article discusses an alternative with some serious upsides. Read on to learn more!

Read the rest of this article »

3 Comments

Memory Allocation Without the GC

Tags: , ,

Unity’s garbage collector is super slow and the bane of our programming life. It’s the reason we can’t use foreach, have to make pools of objects, and go to great lengths to avoid boxing. It’s also seemingly mandatory, but that’s not quite true. Today’s article shows you a way that you can skip the GC and still allocate memory!

Read the rest of this article »

9 Comments

How to Use Runtime Asserts to Find Bugs

Tags: , , , ,

Runtime asserts, not the asserts in unit tests, are a valuable debugging tool for any game developer. Today’s article shows you what they are, how to use them, how not to use them, and how they work. Read on to learn more!

Read the rest of this article »

No Comments

Which JSON Library Creates the Most Garbage?

Tags: , , , , , ,

Which JSON library creates the most garbage? That’s a common question I get in response to my JSON articles. Today’s article finds out the answer!

Read the rest of this article »

3 Comments

Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 7

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Today we’ll wrap up the iterator series by finishing up porting C++’s <algorithm> header. We end up with a library of functions for common LINQ-style algorithms but without any of the garbage creation that slows our games down. Read on for the source and examples!

Read the rest of this article »

No Comments

Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 6

Tags: , , , , , , ,

We’re nearing the end of the series to build a no-garbage replacement for System.Linq. Today we tackle functions that work on already-sorted ranges and functions that work on ranges that are in heap order. These include common set operations like “union” and “intersection”. Read on to see how to use them and for the updated library that you can use to eliminate your garbage creation!

Read the rest of this article »

No Comments

Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 5

Tags: , , , , , , ,

This week we continue with iterators to get the functionality of IEnumerable without the nasty garbage creation. This week the little iterator library gets support for sorting and binary searching. Read on for the details!

Read the rest of this article »

2 Comments

Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 4

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Back from a brief break, we pick up this week by finishing up the “modifying sequence operations” with some gems like RandomShuffle and go through the “partitions” category with functions like Partition and IsPartitioned. These are all solid algorithms with a lot of potential uses, so read on to see how to use them with iterators and for the source code that implements them!

Read the rest of this article »

No Comments

Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 3

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Continuing the series this week we’ll delve into the iterator functions that modify the sequence. This includes handy tools like Copy, SwapRanges, and Transform. Of course this is all done without creating any garbage! Read on to see how and for the full source code.

Read the rest of this article »

No Comments

Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 2

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Last week’s article introduced the concept of iterators as an alternative to the GC-heavy IEnumerable. Today’s article expands the iterator library to include a bunch of more functions to make it useful. Think of these like the extension functions in System.Linq: Any, IndexOf, etc. These have all been tailored to iterators and none of them will create any garbage whatsoever.

Read the rest of this article »

No Comments